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Lecture TOMORROW

31 Oct

“Asian American Art History: Hidden Right Before Our Eyes”
Gordon Chang, Professor of History, Stanford University
Monday, November 1, 2010 ● 4:30 p.m. ● Wilder 101

A professor of American history at Stanford University, Gordon Chang’s research focuses on the history of United States-East Asia relations and on Asian American history. He is particularly interested in the historical connections between race and ethnicity in America and foreign relations, and explores these interconnections in his teaching and scholarship. He is a recipient of Guggenheim and ACLS fellowships, and has been a two-time fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center.
Chang is the editor or author of a number of essays and books, including Chinese American Voices: From the Gold Rush to the Present (2006), Asian Americans and Politics: An Exploration (2001), Morning Glory, Evening Shadow: Yamato Ichihashi and His Wartime Writing, 1942-1945 (1997), and Friends and Enemies: The United States, China, and the Soviet Union, 1948-1972 (1990). His most recent work, American Asian Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008) is the first comprehensive study of the lives and artistic production of American Asian artists active in the United States before 1970. He is currently at work on a “long” history of U.S.-China relations from the colonial era to the present.

Sponsored by Oberlin College Comparative American Studies Program, Oberlin College Shansi, Oberlin College Art Department (Baldwin Fund), Oberlin College Department of History (Anderson Fund), Oberlin College East Asian Studies Program, Oberlin College Multicultural Resource Center

 
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Posted by on October 31, 2010 in Visiting Speaker

 

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